Social Media Journalist Need To Show Some Responsibility

If you thought this post was half way interesting, you might want to follow @joehall on Twitter. Hes a total nut bag over there, but worth a few laughs.

4 Comments

Tim Staines on June 20, 2009 at 5:02 pm.

Joe,

I see where you’re coming from here, but I respectfully disagree with you. Yes, revolution is a big deal and people will die, but I think Jason’s posts are a far cry from “insighting revolution”. The protesters over there in Iran and the government that may have rigged an election and the police that are shooting people are the ones insighting revolution. Jason made his twitter world aware of what is actually going on over there and showed the reality of the situation to an audience of 70,000 potentially web savvy followers that might be able to draw more attention to a situation that could affect us all.
It is when light is NOT shed on these types of situations and the world does NOT find out about them that we end up with oppressive regimes that just kill people for acts of dissension, or worse, just for having a different religious belief or skin color.
So I think the consequences are worse when these videos are NOT shared and we are NOT drawing attention to a volatile situation that has the potential to impact lives & political interests throughout most of the world.

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Nick Dupree on June 20, 2009 at 6:35 pm.

strongly disagree… the barbaric actions of this evil regime should be EXPOSED, high and low. We shouldn’t cooperate with Ayatullah Khameinei in supressing the evidence.

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Alysson on June 20, 2009 at 8:02 pm.

Change will never come if the fight goes on silently within the borders of nations on the other side of the planet. Bearing witness to such heinous acts and doing nothing is no different than directly condoning the acts of the Iranian government against its citizens.

Every revolution needs a voice. Turning a blind eye and not sharing the evidence of crimes against humanity is what allows the perpetrators to continue on indefinitely. Never before has the world at large had the opportunity to share the perspective of the people living out the drama as it unfolds. This is the power of the social web to change the world. There is a purpose to the social web that is greater than just sharing dick jokes and videos of douchebags lighting their farts on fire.

This is not sensationalism. This is life. This is death. This is a defining moment for Iran. This is a chance for the rest of the world to let the people fighting for freedom in Iran know that they are not alone, they are not being ignored and that this battle is not going on in secret.

Your opinion is that sharing these videos will lead to more deaths. I don’t believe that is true. If people around the world continue sharing these videos and carrying on these conversations online perhaps it will dawn on Iran that the entire world is watching. Perhaps that realization will lessen the ferocity of their attacks against their own citizens and reduce the number of lives lost.

The fact is that doing nothing has never changed the world. Turning our backs on the brave people standing up and fighting for their rights isn’t the right thing to do. Revolution doesn’t come easy. And it doesn’t come cheap. The price of freedom is high. The citizens of Iran are willing to pay that price. The least we can do is be willing to witness it.

We can’t forget that these videos and this information is being shared by the citizens of Iran. They want the story told. They want the world to know what’s going on. It would be a slap in the face to those risking their lives to get this story out to not share their contributions so that those who lay down their lives in the fight for change may not be lost in vain.

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Gerald on August 19, 2009 at 11:53 am.

Joe- Great video, but I must respectfully disagree. Do you think for 2 seconds the repressive regime in Tehran would permit these gatherings with or without media coverage? Without the social media content, much of what WAS revealed during the Tweets will put the victims in the annals of history rather than a faceless number like so many others in neighboring countries. I absolutely understand what you are saying, and I agree the person doing the “reporting” should exercise some judgement, but in the end, these folks who were killed for demonstrating were destined to be murdered by their own government whether we had received a public record of the event or not.

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